• Advanced Academics

    AP Biology

    This course is for those students who desire a course in university-level freshman biology that meets the College Board AP Biology course requirements. Students who take an AP Biology course will develop advanced inquiry and reasoning skills, such as designing a plan for collecting data, analyzing data, applying mathematical routines, and connecting concepts in and across domains. The result will be readiness for the study of advanced topics in subsequent college courses The goal of this course is to provide a learning environment that enables the student to develop a solid understanding of the principle concepts of biology. A substantial amount of time will be required for study. Self-motivation and organization are a must. Topics will include, but not be limited to, biochemistry, genetics, molecular and cellular biology, as well as biological processes and systems. The AP Biology course is equivalent to a two-semester college introductory biology course and has been endorsed enthusiastically by higher education officials. Students are expected to take the AP exam.

    Prerequisite: Biology 1, Chemistry 1(Pre-AP preferred)
    Instructor: Lee Don Juan

    AP Calculus AB

    Building enduring mathematical understanding requires students to understand the why and how of mathematics in addition to mastering the necessary procedures and skills. To foster this deeper level of learning, AP Calculus is designed to develop mathematical knowledge conceptually, guiding students to connect topics and representations throughout each course and to apply strategies and techniques to accurately solve diverse types of problems. The curriculum for AP Calculus AB is equivalent to that of a first-semester college calculus course. The course is taught over a full academic year. Students are expected to take the AP exam.

    Prerequisite: Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2 and PreCalculus (Pre-AP preferred)
    Instructor: Sara Gail Cranford

    AP Calculus BC

    AP Calculus BC covers topics found in two semesters of college calculus. It includes differential and integral calculus with conceptual, mechanical, and applicable study in the calculus of functions of a single variable. First semester topics include limits, differentiation, integration, optimization, related rates, area and volume, slope fields, and differential equations, as well as an in-depth look at the Mean Value Theorem, the Intermediate Value Theorem, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Second semester topics include infinite series, conic sections, plane curves, parametric equations, polar coordinates, Euler’s method, and vector-valued functions. Once a student has received a passing grade for the first semester of BC Calculus, the student cannot transfer to AB Calculus for the spring semester. Students are expected to take the AP exam.

    Prerequisite: Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2 and PreCalculus (Pre-AP preferred)
    Instructor: Taylor Darwin

    AP Chemistry

    This course is for students who desire a university-level freshman inorganic chemistry class that meets the College Board AP Chemistry requirements. Extensive problem-solving and analysis are required. Self-motivation and organization are a must. Topics will include, but are not limited to: periodicity, quantum mechanics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics. A complete listing can be found at the College Board website www.collegeboard.com. This course is recommended for students who plan to major in science, engineering, pre-med, or math in college and are planning to attend a 4-year university. A strong algebra math foundation is essential for success. It is recommended that students be enrolled in Pre- Calculus or higher math when taking AP Chemistry 2. Students will need to keep a detailed laboratory notebook. Students are expected to take the AP exam. Students are expected to take the AP exam.

    Prerequisite: Algebra 2 and Chemistry (Pre-AP preferred)
    Instructor: Karen Dirks

    AP Computer Science A

    Computer Science embraces problem solving, hardware, algorithms, and perspectives that help people utilize computers to address real-world problems in contemporary life. The AP Computer Science A curriculum provides resources, such as application-related labs, that connect with students with diverse interests.

    This is a college-level course that introduces students to computer science with fundamental topics that include problem solving, design strategies and methodologies, data structures, algorithms, analysis of potential solutions, and the ethical and social implications of computing. This course prepares the student for the Advanced Placement Exam. Students are expected to take the AP exam.

    Prerequisite: Algebra 1 (Pre-AP preferred)
    Instructor: Mary Culver

    AP English Language and Composition

    The AP English Language and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum, which requires students to develop evidence-based analytical and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Throughout the course, students develop a personal style by making appropriate grammatical choices. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non-fiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text, from many disciplines and historical periods. Students are expected to take the AP exam. Students are expected to take the AP exam.

    Prerequisite: English 1 and English 2 (Pre-AP preferred) summer reading required by district
    Instructors: Katie Hooper and Mark Teel

    AP English Literature and Composition

    An AP English Literature and Composition course engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers, As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style and themes, as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism and tone. Students are expected to take the AP exam.

    Prerequisite: English 1, English 2 and English 3 (Pre-AP preferred) summer reading required by district
    Instructor: Julie Worster

    AP Environmental Science

    The AP Environmental Science course is designed to be the equivalent of a one-semester, introductory college course in environmental science. The goal of the course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. Environmental issues and management alternatives will be investigated. This course is taught in a full academic year. Students are expected to take the AP exam.

    Prerequisite: Algebra 1, one year of Life Science and one year of Physical Science (Pre-AP preferred)
    Instructor: Sharon Hillis

    AP Macroeconomics (spring semester course)

    AP Macroeconomics is an introductory college-level course that focuses on the principles that apply to an economic system as a whole. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination; it also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts. This course is taught in one semester. Students are expected to take the AP exam.

    Prerequisite: none
    Instructor: Owen Rust

    AP Microeconomics (fall semester course)

    AP Microeconomics is an introductory college-level course that focuses on the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual economic decision-makers. The course also develops students’ familiarity with the operation of product and factor markets, distributions of income, market failure, and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts. Students are expected to take the AP exam. This course is taught in one semester. Students are expected to take the AP exam.

    Prerequisite: none
    Instructor: Owen Rust

    AP Physics 1

    AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of Physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore these topics: kinematics; dynamics; circular motion and gravitation; energy; momentum; simple harmonic motion; torque and rotational motion; electric charge and electric force; DC circuits; and mechanical waves and sound. AP Physics 1 is a full-year course that is the equivalent of a first-semester introductory college course in algebra-based physics. Students are expected to take the AP exam.

    Prerequisite: Geometry and Algebra 2 or concurrent enrollment in Algebra 2 (Pre-AP preferred)
    Instructors: David Baker and Cory Callaway

    AP Physics 2

    AP Physics 2 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of Physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore these topics: fluids, thermodynamics, electrical force, field, and potential; electric circuits; magnetism and electromagnetic induction; geometric and physical optics, and quantum, atomic and nuclear physics. AP Physics 2 is a full-year course that is the equivalent of a second-semester introductory college course in algebra-based physics. Students are expected to take the AP exam.

    Prerequisite: PreCalculus or concurrent enrollment (Pre-AP preferred)
    Instructor: David Baker

    AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism (spring semester course)

    AP Physics C is taught as a second-year physics course. AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism should provide instruction in each of the following content areas: electrostatics; conductors, capacitors and dielectrics; electric circuits; magnetic fields; and electromagnetism. This course is typically taught the second semester of the year. This course is calculus-based and therefore concurrent enrollment (or prior completion of) calculus is mandatory. Students are expected to take the AP exam.

    Prerequisite: Physics C: Mechanics and Calculus or concurrent enrollment in Calculus
    Instructor: Cory Callaway

    AP Physics C: Mechanics (fall semester course)

    AP Physics C: Mechanics is taught as a second-year physics course. Physics C: Mechanics should provide instruction in each of the following content areas: kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and oscillations and gravitation. This course is calculus-based and therefore concurrent enrollment (or prior completion of) calculus is mandatory. Students are expected to take the AP exam.

    Prerequisite: Physics and Calculus or concurrent enrollment in Calculus (AP Physics 1 or 2 preferred)
    Instructor: Cory Callaway

    AP Psychology

    The AP Psychology course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social psychology.

    Throughout the course, students employ psychological research methods, including ethical considerations, as they use the scientific method, analyze bias, evaluate claims and evidence, and effectively communicate ideas. Students are expected to take the AP exam.

    Prerequisite: None
    Instructor: Robert Benson

    AP Spanish Language and Culture

    Emphasis in this course will be on fluent usage of oral and written Spanish. This course is a continuation of the study introduced in Pre-AP Spanish 3. In addition to a review of grammatical points, the course includes reading of more difficult stories, articles and novels that reflect the culture of Spanish-speaking areas. The course will focus on listening comprehension, speaking, reading comprehension, grammar usage and written composition. Students will comprehend formal and informal spoken Spanish, read a variety of works in Spanish, compose expository passages, and express ideas orally with accuracy and fluency. Students are expected to take the AP exam.

    Prerequisite: Spanish 3 (Pre-AP preferred)
    Instructor: Elvira Natividad

    AP Spanish Literature and Culture

    This course is designed to provide students with a learning experience equivalent to that of an introductory college course in literature written in Spanish. The course introduces students to the formal study of a representative body of texts from Peninsular Spanish, Latin American, and U.S. Hispanic literature.

    The overarching aims of the course are to provide students with ongoing and varied opportunities to further develop their proficiencies across the full range of language skills, with special attention to critical reading and analytical writing and to encourage them to reflect on the many voices and cultures included in a rich and diverse body of literature written in Spanish. Students are expected to take the AP exam.

    Prerequisite: Spanish 4 (AP preferred)
    Instructor: Elvira Natividad

    AP Statistics

    The purpose of the AP course in statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. These will include representing and organizing data, utilizing probability distributions such as the normal or binomial distributions, and using statistical methods to make inferences. The course will include use of current technology and will emphasize experimental design. Students are expected to take the AP exam. Students are expected to take the AP exam.

    Prerequisite: Algebra 2 and PreCalculus (Pre-AP preferred)
    Instructor: John Barfield

    AP Studio Art

    The Studio Art AP course enables highly motivated students to do college level artwork while still in high school and conforms to College Board national standards for quality, concentration, and depth. AP Studio Art is not based on a written examination. Students instead will complete works of art during the year of study that include actual works that demonstrate mastery of drawing in concept, composition and execution; digital images, some of which may be details describing a in –depth exploration of a particular drawing concern; and digital images of one each of different works exhibiting a variety of works demonstrating the understanding of the principles of drawing issues. Students are expected to submit a portfolio to College Board.

    Prerequisite: Art 1 and one year of another Art class
    Instructor: Eric Vickery

    AP US Government and Politics (one semester course)

    AP US Government and Politics is designed for qualified students who wish to complete studies in high school equivalent to a one-semester college introductory course. Iw will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics. The student will become familiar with the Constitutional underpinnings of United States Government; political beliefs and behaviors; political parties and interest groups; the institutions and policy processes of national government; civil rights and civil liberties. Students will acquire the skills of analyzing data, and writing and presenting written and oral arguments which will prepare them for the demands of beginning and intermediate college courses. Students are expected to take the AP exam.

    Prerequisite: None
    Instructor: Owen Rust

    AP U.S. History

    The AP U.S. History course focuses on the development of historical thinking skills (chronological reasoning, comparing and contextualizing, crafting historical arguments using historical evidence, and interpreting and synthesizing historical narrative) and the development of students’ abilities to think conceptually about U.S. history. Seven themes of equal importance – American and National Identity; Migration and Settlement; Politics and Power; Work, Exchange, and Technology; America in the World; Geography and the Environment; and Culture and Society – provide areas of historical inquiry for investigation throughout the course. These require students to reason historically about continuity and change over time and make comparisons among various historical developments in different times and places. The course also allows teachers flexibility across nine different periods of U.S. history to teach topics of their choice in depth. Students are expected to take the AP exam.

    Prerequisite:
    Instructors: Margaret Wilson and Mark LaCroix